22 hours in Marrakech, Morocco

After four amazing days at a retreat for creative entrepreneurs by HDYTI in Essaouira, a port city on Morocco’s Atlantic coast, it was almost time to return home. But I didn’t want to go home without having ever visited the city I’d be flying out from, so I booked a night in the gorgeous Sapphire Riad & Spa in the Marrakech medina and had less than 24 hours to explore everything I wanted to see and eat everything I wanted to eat in the dynamic city of Marrakech, a popular destination for solo travelers, couples, families as well as groups of friends. If you were ever in doubt whether 22 to 24 hours is really enough time, doubt no more. Perhaps you’d like to know more about my trip to Essaouira or read a little more about the luxurious Riad I stayed at? Don’t worry, blog posts will be up soon!

But first, here’s how I spent 22 hours in Marrakech

3 pm: Arrived in Marrakech, checked in at the Riad and got a tour around the gorgeous property – and enjoyed some complimentary mint tea and pastries. How divine!

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4 pm: The owner and staff members at the Riad were all lovely. In fact, they were so kind that I didn’t even have to worry about getting lost in the market as I was accompanied by a staff member to all the places I wanted to visit until it was time to return to the Riad for dinner. I guess he worried I’d get lost and never find my way back and end up sleeping on the streets somewhere. Which I am 100% certain would be the case if I had been wandering around completely by myself. I am a woman of few talents, but getting lost is definitely my biggest talent. I am always a damsel in distress whenever I travel solo. Always. Although that’s nothing to brag about, really.

Thanks to a male staff member from the Riad guiding me around the city, I felt safer than ever – except from when I almost got run over by scooters, bicycles and tuktuks going full speed through the small streets of the Medina.

First stop was the Maison de la Photographie de Marrakech – a museum of Moroccan photography. I would have never been able to find this museum on my own as it’s quite hidden past the souks of central old town Marrakech, down the narrow alleys of the Medina, somewhere around there, you’ll find this lovely little museum. Most of the photos displayed were in black and white and they all told a story. My favorite photo was one of a woman sitting next to two men, exposing her bare legs and laughing. She looked like a Moroccan Marilyn Monroe. Another photo I liked, was a photo of a group of veiled women. I loved the contrast between them and the leggy vixen.

I wanted to sit down and order a beverage at the roof terrace cafe, but impatience got the best of me as the waiter never came my way to take my order. So I skipped the pause cafe and focused on my photography instead.

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5:30 pm: “Do you want to visit the Ben Youssef Madrasa Koran school?” the lovely man from the Riad asked me. Of course I did. I wanted to see everything. Not trying to be holier than thou or anything but thankfully I was dressed like a conservative gal and not like a careless westerner in short shorts and a tank top like some of the tourists I’d seen in the Medina and even entering the Ben Youssef Madrasa. I love my shorts and tank tops just as much as the next girl, don’t get me wrong, but there’s a time and place for everything.

Founded in the 14th century, this former Islamic college is the most stunning piece of architecture found in the Medina (in my opinion). With a courtyard richly carved in cedar, marble and stucco, consisting entirely of inscriptions and geometric patterns, this historical site is simply too beautiful to miss out on.

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6:00 pm: We spent about one hour visiting the busy market in Djemaa El-Fna. I wasn’t planning on buying anything and I barely even dared to look and no way did I touch anything at all. The vendors at the market seemed to be quite aggravated whenever I said no to whatever they had to offer. One lady tried to push me into getting henna tattoos done – something I should avoid like the plague as I suffer from eczema. I declined politely and she got seriously offended and asked me one more time, purposely ignoring my previous answer. I told her yet again that I wasn’t interested and she rolled her eyes at me and mumbled “oh la la, les touristes”. Lesson one; if you want to sell me stuff, make me laugh. Works like a charm. Just ask the gentleman in Essaouira who almost had me rolling on the floor laughing my butt off – and sold me jewelry when I wasn’t even planning to buy anything.

We finished the tour with a cup of tea at the market square, watching the sunset while acrobats entertained us with their choreographed moves.

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7:15 pm Morocco is amazing in many different ways, one of them being the way disabled people are treated. With respect, dignity and given the opportunity to work a full time job just like everybody else. Just because you depend on your wheelchair to get from A to B doesn’t mean you have to be physically bound to it at all times. Just ask the Moroccan tuktuk-drivers. In Morocco the disabled are given the opportunity to work as tuktuk-chauffeurs – and I think we got the most fast and furious one of them all.  At times I worried we’d run someone over with our full-speed tuktuk. That guy was not stopping for anyone. Buses, cars, women, children, red lights, queues, you name it – ain’t nobody got time for that!

Back at the Riad, I had about thirty minutes to relax in my room before getting ready for my three course meal. I’ll tell you all about my meal in a separate post (on the Riad). I’ll tell you one thing, though. It was delicious. Just like everything else I ate in Morocco.

8:50 am: The Riad had arranged for a guide to come meet me in the morning to take me to the sites I wanted to visit before heading to the airport at 1 pm. A bubbly Moroccan woman with the most beautiful smile and charming accent waited for me by the entrance to the Riad. She introduced herself and promised me we’d have enough time to do both the Jardin Majorelle and the Bahia Palace before returning to the Riad for my manicure appointment at noon. We hailed a cab and left the Medina to visit these spectacular sites.

Luck was on our side as there was absolutely no line to enter the Jardin Majorelle. We took advantage of the situation and the guide had me posing for photos pretty much everywhere in the garden – also for some videos that I’m not even sure I’m gonna share with anyone as I am probably the most awkward person you’d ever see on video. It’s cringe worthy, I tell you. The garden was amazingly beautiful. With the exception of one thing: vandalism done by tourists who think it’s a great idea to carve their initials into the bamboo, cactuses and other plants in the garden. It upset my guide to see it. And me too.

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Jardin Majorelle (or Majorelle Garden) is a botanical garden and the Islamic Art Museum of Marrakech. The building was designed by French artist Jacques Majorelle in the 1920’s and 30’s and the garden has been open to the public since 1947. Since 1980 the garden was owned by fashion designer Yves Saint-Laurent and his partner Pierre Bergé. Yves Saint-Laurent’s ashes were scattered in the Majorelle Garden.

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09:30 am Next stop, Bahia Palace. We hailed a cab and went to the opposite part of Marrakech. Ahead of schedule and again no line to buy tickets. Being an earlybird sure pays off!

The palace was built in the late 19th century and the name “Bahia” is actually Arabic for “brilliance” and “beautiful”. The palace was originally built for the Grand Vizier of the Sultan and was later occupied by his son and the four wives and several concubines.

Today, the spectacular Bahia Palace is one of the biggest tourist attractions in Marrakech.

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10:45 “Would you like to visit a Berber pharmacy and learn about the local products?” my guide asked me and explained to me that she loved the makeup from there as well as the spices, oils and scents. Curious as I am, I obviously said yes. I ended up buying a whole lot of products as well. A really good lipstick (finally one that actually hydrates my lips and doesn’t stain), a stinky cream for my eczema, some sort of remedy for when you have a blocked nose – and five or six other products. Saffron included – so I guess I’ll have to start searching for recipes and actually use it!

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11:30 am We still had about thirty minutes before I had to return to the Riad and I wanted to spend those thirty minutes wisely. My guide suggested that we’d walk to the Saadian Tombs and visit them quickly.

The Saadian Tombs date back from the time of the sultan Ahmad al-Mansur in the 15th-16th century). They were only first discovered in 1917 and were restored by Beaux-arts service. About sixty members of the Saadi dynasty were buried in the mausoleum. Their servants and soldiers were buried outside, in the garden.

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12:00 am Back in the Riad, just in time for my manicure appointment. My fragile, broken nails looked horrible and needed as much care and attention as possible. The lady who gave me the manicure told me to eat more bananas. In Poland they usually tell me to rub lemon juice on my nails. In Norway they tell me to drink more milk. Guess I should do all of the above to maintain good healthy nails.

1:00 pm The King was in town and traffic was worse than usual as everyone had to take an alternative route since the main one was blocked for security reasons. My taxi driver got me to the airport in time and even gave me a few mandarins to enjoy while waiting for my flight. I ate one and packed two in my handbag. A little souvenir from a country that has the freshest fruit juice I’ve ever had and the juiciest fruit salad I’ve ever tasted.

As I waited for my flight I browsed through the photos I’d taken during my 22 hours in Marrakech and smiled to myself. I might not have seen it all, but I sure am happy with everything I did see!

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Review: Country chic at Les Vieilles Tours

Where it is: Lafage, 46500 Rocamadour (Le Lot department, France)

 

Website: http://www.vtrocamadour.com/

Who is it suitable for: couples, families.

Thumbs up for…: friendly staff, amazing food

Thumbs down for…: the outdated furniture/decor in our room.

**

As we entered the lobby, we were completely alone. No one at the front desk, and only a dog – a calm and quiet Labrador – was guarding the driveway. We searched high and low for anyone, any person at all, who worked there and could check us in.

…That was until we realized how little we had paid attention to the small but quite  obvious details on the reception desk. A button to push and something in the lines of “call me” written on it. We blamed our ignorance on being tired after a long drive. Only seconds after we’d pushed that button, the hostess arrived and welcomed us.

Welcome to a charming 17th-century manor house and its 2 annex buildings, located in a tranquil environment. Each room is individually decorated in the style of country chic and features en suite bathrooms. Our room had an extra bed in a separate room, which is nice for those who travel with a third companion. Families with one child, for example.

I like country chic decor and vintage interior. But our particular guest room could need a change of furniture and textiles. The brick wall, however, gives the room a rustic and cool look, and the exterior of the annex is idyllic and gorgeous.

It was too chilly outside to try the outdoor swimming pool. I was – for a brief moment – considering giving it a try, until I realized I’d probably catch a cold if I did.

The restaurant was my highlight of the stay. The atmosphere was relaxing and perfect for a romantic evening. The decor was simple and classic – as classic as the menu. Those who love French gastronomy will appreciate everything served here. Those who don’t really know the French kitchen that well; give the menu a try and you’ll be in for a pleasant surprise!

Our waiter was a lovely man, always with a smile on his face. We weren’t sure which red wine to choose and asked him for advice. He recommended one that tasted absolutely exquisite. A little fruity, not too dry, not too strong – it was perfect for us.

The breakfast served the following morning was as French as the meal we enjoyed the night before. A glass of juice, a cup of coffee and a few pastries later  and it was time to get back on the road and leave the country chic environment – for now.

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Guest blogger: Brittany Hayward. Adventures in Perth, Australia

Sitting on a cramped bus, in the middle of the Western Australian desert made me re-think downing over 3L of “daily-recommended” water.
Being miles from anywhere led roommates Jose, Vicky and I to the truest of Aussie landscapes; the big and barren WA. Home to white beaches, optional foot attire and the world’s most isolated city.
After an exhausting 4-hour flight we hit the Sheralee Hostel in Perth. Practically an ancient ruin, the place challenged the boundaries of cleanliness. Our evening stay was accompanied by a dead cockroach, a bloody kitchen brawl of Irishman, and a Chinese man determined to catch the mouse inhabiting our room.
Waking up to our neighbors alarm an hour earlier then needed, we were ready to catch our tour leaving for the far north. Leaving the dust mites and grime behind us we boarded the 20 person bus jammed pack with tourists mostly from Europe.
Led by “Bachelor Bob” (coined due to the lack of wedding ring), Bob both guided and drove
the diverse crew up the coast. Stopping at places like the Pinnacle Desert, white sandy beaches and the Wildlife Park where Jose taught a multicoloured finch how to dance. Apparently Spaniards have a way with the wildlife.
Kilometre after another, we continued on towards Kalgone National Park. When entering I obeyed the instructions by keeping hydrated for the remainder of time hiking. The views of the rocky red terrain were one of a kind and my camera couldn’t get enough. By the end of the day we made it to Monkey Mia, but before our glorious arrival we made a much need “pee-pee” break at the Billabong Roadhouse.
Word of the wise: keep water consumption to a minimum when stopping at 3-hour increments.
We capped the day with a sunset over the Indian Ocean, and a bobbing turtle
wishing us goodnight. Getting an early start to the day we watched bottlenose dolphins swim up to shallow beach, followed by a morning of sailing at Shark Bay.
Growing closer with our fellow travelers we headed to lookouts at Shell Beach, Hamelin pools and Eagles Bluff. Our final overnight stay was a farm reserve, miles from civilization and cell phone reception. Luckily the stench of our barn accommodation didn’t bother us too much.
With only a day ahead of us we concluded the tour with sandboarding, peeing in the outback and bowing down to HRH Prince Leonard of Hutt River Principality. Hutt River is an independent state succeeding Australian rules and laws. It’s hard to imagine, but getting a stamp in our passports was definitely the biggest highlight!
The drive back to Perth was long and tiring, but left lingering views of open paddocks, grazing kangaroos and running emus. After this trip, I can confidently wash my pee down the toilet, tolerate the extent of greasiness, speak beginner Spanish, and answer all of life’s questions with She’s the Man quotes. Western Australia is forgotten and desolate, but full of hidden gems.
The 4-day tour was a blur, but I’ve got a lifetime of knowledge.
Follow Brittany’s blog and let her interesting stories and gorgeous photos take you on a wonderful journey around the world!
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A different side of Warsaw, Poland

When you think of Poland, do you think about Kraków? Do you think about vodka? Do you think about unpronounceable names with too many consonants and not enough vowels? Well, let me give you something new to think about.

Welcome to Warsaw, the capital city of my favorite Eastern European country (because I’m half Polish and obviously biased). Welcome to a diverse, cosmopolitan city and its young, vibrant environment. It’s not all young and urban here, though. There’s still the Old Town with its beautiful ancient architecture, and the historical royal palaces and their parks on the outskirts of the city. I’m gonna talk more about some of those.

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My favorite park is the Lazienki Park, which is the largest park in Warsaw. It was designed in the 17th century, and the palace on the water – Lazienki Palace – is a must see while visiting this picturesque park. What is the history of this marvelous palace and park complex, you may ask. It was built as a summer residence for King Stanislaw August, and was later used by the President of Poland. Today, its a museum and a venue for cultural, scientific and entertainment events. Speaking of which; from May to September – at noon and at 4 pm – free outdoor Chopin concerts take place there. Take the bus (116, 166, 180) from the central train/bus station to Lazienki Królewskie and check it out!

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Another park I’ve fallen in love with is the garden of the historic Wilanów palace – the “Polish Versailles”, and second home to various Polish kings. Just like the Lazienki Palace, the Wilanów Palace is also open for tourists to visit as a museum. Take the bus (519 or 700) from the central train/bus station to come here and enjoy this idyllic garden!

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After spending a full day in one of these parks, I’m sure your legs are gonna be exhausted from all the walking. And maybe you need a bit of caffeine and some sugar? And a what about a cuddle? You’re probably wondering what on earth I’m on about, and it’s not as weird as it sounds – although some people may still find it weird anyway. Follow me to Miau Cafe – the first cat cafe in Warsaw! I have never felt as calm and relaxed as I did in the lounge area of this establishment. It’s completely hygienic, as all food and drinks are prepared in a closed kitchen area – away from the furry kitties. And the cats are not crawling all over your stuff if you (or the hostess) tell them to back off.

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I’m sure some of you are interested in visiting Poland because you want to go shopping. I don’t blame you. My mother is crazy about it, so I’ve spent a whole lot of time with her inside of the malls of Warsaw searching for things we don’t need, to impress people we don’t like. At least it’s not that expensive to go shopping in Warsaw – although it’s way more expensive now than it used to be, before Poland became one of the fastest growing economies in the EU. Zlote Tarasy is kind of hard to miss if you come to Warsaw city center by train or bus, as it’s just across the street from the central train station. This mall has everything you need and more. All kinds of stores, a hypermarket, a food court and a movie theater.

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The other one worth checking out is the large shopping mall Arkadia , which is easy to reach by public transportation, as nine of the tram lines and six of the buses go there. Grab an ice-cold beer at the Bierhalle or one of the many ice cream desserts at Grycan. Enjoy!

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Let me ask you again; when you think of Poland, what do you think about? Did any of these things tempt you into visiting Warsaw during your next trip to Poland?

If yes, then here’s another idea for what you can do in Warsaw. Sit down in a Pierogi-restaurant, order those dumplings filled with deliciousness, raise your pint of Polish beer or your vodka-based cocktail and say “Na Zdrowie!”. You’re welcome.

 

A sweet taste of Bruges, Belgium

I had wanted to visit Belgium for such a long time. Six years ago, I even bought a plane ticket to Brussels and was planning to stay with some people I met on Couchsurfing . Unfortunately, I had to cancel that trip due to financial problems. Two years later, I made plans to go to Antwerp. But that trip never happened either. I was starting to wonder if it just wasn’t in the cards for me to ever go to Belgium. 

I was wrong. You know the saying “the longer you have to wait for something, the more you will appreciate it when it finally arrives”? I guess that’s why I hadn’t made it to Belgium yet. It just wasn’t the right time. But this year, this spring, I finally made it there. I spent a fantastic weekend in Bruges, a beautiful city often referred to as “Venice of the north”.

The sun was shining and I wore a pink summer dress to celebrate spring and the lovely weather. My boyfriend and I were looking forward to a romantic weekend together in this gorgeous Belgian city. There were so many things I wanted to see – and taste!

I’m not a beer drinker at all, but I had heard good things about the famous Kriek (Belgian cherry-flavored beer) and other Belgian fruit beers. We visited a few craft beer bars and absolutely every single beer I tried, was amazing. That’s coming from someone who doesn’t like beer! I highly recommend 2be – a great bar with a large selection of beers on tap. They also have a beer shop, if you wanna take some souvenirs/beverages home with you.

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The beer tasting made me hungry for a snack – or two. I went to one of the many Friterie’s to get fries in a cone. Because, French fries are actually Belgian – and not French. And they definitely tasted better in Belgium. And my second snack? White chocolate covered Belgian waffle on a stick from Go.Fre, sprinkled with nuts. It was delicious!

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We had recently bought our bright new Nikon-camera and were ready to explore the city and take some gorgeous photos with it. It wasn’t a hard task. The picturesque bridges and beautiful canals, the medieval architecture. How could anyone not fall in love with this city?

Before leaving Bruges, we bought some fine Belgian chocolates. Now was not the time to worry about dieting. I couldn’t possibly imagine a high as good as the taste of those luxurious artisan chocolates.

A perfect way to end a perfect trip to the country I wanted to visit for so long.

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Why your next holiday should be Zanzibar Island!

In collaboration with Love & Dove Africa, I’m excited to tell you all about the place that could be your next holiday destination, your honeymoon, family trip, romantic getaway – or at least for now, the new addition to your bucket list. Welcome to Zanzibar!

(all images  in this post are copyright to Love & Dove Africa)

The Zanzibar Archipelago is located in the Indian Ocean, 15 miles off the coast of Tanzania. Zanzibar is the ultimate Indian Ocean Paradise with a fascinating history, with its magnificent old city Stone Town and incredibly spectacular beaches. Zanzibar is a rich cultural and artistic hub. During your visit to this beautiful island you will be awed by the rich culture, artistry and history. Over centuries, different cultures have influenced Zanzibar to become what it is today. Sumerians, Assyrians, Egyptians, Phoenicians, Indians, Chinese, Persians, Portuguese, Omani Arabs, Dutch and the British have settled here at one time or another and influenced the local culture into its present fusion. The beautiful Swahili language is spoken on the Zanzibar island. Stone Town, Zanzibar City’s old town, was included in UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites in year 2000.

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Zanzibar is a perfect destination both for those who want a relaxing holiday and those who want adventures. Here you can combine spectacular safari adventures with calm days on the beach on this magnificent tropical island. A holiday in Zanzibar is ideal for marine junkies and water sports enthusiasts. You can choose from activities like snorkeling, scuba diving and deep sea diving (among others). You will enjoy the graceful shorelines of Zanzibar islands, with views of exotic ancient dhows in full sail. Enjoy casual walks while soaking your feel in warm, shallow waters along the edge of the white sandy beaches. Zanzibar is a marvelous destination for retreats with its “home away from home” atmosphere. To add even more luxury and relaxation to your trip, enjoy the wonderful spa treatments. And prepare yourself for great Swahili cuisine!

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Cultural Tours in Zanzibar

Listed below are some inspirational experiences and touristic activities that one can engage in while in Zanzibar. These activities are not only enjoyable but also culturally and historically informative. You can take day tours with the assistance of a tour guide.

Tour of Spice Plantations and Markets

Some have referred to Zanzibar island as the “spice island”. These tours are uniquely special because the local guide will aid you in learning more about the history of the spice trade in the region. There are several spice farms spread out on the island. For those of you foodies out there, who are interested in venturing into obtaining some knowledge on the Swahili culinary culture, a spice tour on a farm is an ideal activity! Under the supervision of a local guide, you can take approximately four tours to any of the several spice farms and learn more about the growing process of the spices. Some spices grown include cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla, cardamom , chilies, saffron, curries and gloves among others. Fresh fruits are wildly grown on the island – such as coconuts, oranges, limes, lemons, jackfruits and durians among others. It’s a beautiful experience strolling down the narrow farm paths, taking in the aroma of several fresh spices. Especially if you’re a foodie, like myself! At the end of the tour, you may even enjoy some delicious traditionally prepared Swahili dishes, directly from the fresh farm produce. You may also purchase spices, which are reasonably priced. You can’t get more organic than that!

Stone Town Seaside front

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Arts and Crafts Tours

Zanzibar island has a rich fusion of artistry inspired by African, Omani Arab, Persian, European, Indian and Portuguese influences among others. You can take a tour in Stone Town visiting several vibrant workshops dealing in handmade textiles, woodwork and fine arts. You will find tailored textiles made from the local Khanga, a local cotton textile which is traditionally worn by young girls and women around the region. These textiles come in amazing colors and prints and usually have special Swahili inspired expressions printed on them. At the wood workshop, you’ll see how the beautiful oriental inspired wooden beds – and the famous Zanzibar majestic doors – are made. The wood works have such magnificent intrinsic hand caved details, which is a special artistry of the island. On this tour you’ll take a stroll down the narrow alleys of the Old Town, you’ll enjoy the sights of the splendid, historical architecture. You can also visit local markets at Darajani, Mwanakwerekwe, the bazaars and ruins of the Sultan palace. The Old Town is filled with amazing restaurants and cafes where you can enjoy fresh seafood and juices prepared the special Shawili way. Some of these cafes and restaurants are overseeing the picturesque Indian Ocean view, which will give you a soothing feeling after a great morning or afternoon tour. Bring your camera!

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Arts Zanzibar

Seafood Stall at Forodhani Gardens

Tour to Prison Island

Visiting the “Prison Island”/Changu Island is a great daytime excursion in Zanzibar. The Sultans used the little island sanctuary as a jail for rebellious slaves in the 1860s. In the late 1800s the British built a prison here, which was used as  a yellow fever quarantine center and not as a prison as commonly believed. On the island, you walk down the footpaths and visit the Aldabra Giant Tortoise sanctuary, which are originally gifted from the Seychelles and they’re supposedly 100 years or older – and at a hefty weight of 200 kilos! You can also see some different bird species, butterflies and duiker antelopes. This island is also a perfect location for snorkeling, with its white sand beach. A beautiful restaurant and resort is also located here.

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Watersports Activities 

The turquoise waters along the coast of Zanzibar and Pemba Island are also packed with abundant sea life and coral reef for snorkeling and diving and several water sports. For those of you who have a big sense of adventure and love water sports, these activities are a must do. Besides snorkeling and diving, other activites include jet skiing, windsurfing, kayaking, parasailing, fishing, and dhow cruising (especially in the evening) and more.

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Visit the Old Slave Market & Anglican Cathedral

While in Stone Town, a visit to the old slave market is an informative trip about the horrifying treatment of slaves in Zanzibar. You will get to see the appalling conditions of the dingy slave chambers where slaves were held captive and shackled. Outside, by the Cathedral, there’s a monument depicting how slaves were shackled in a pit. It’s historical and worth seeing while in Stone Town. For a small fee, a guide will give you a tour. On the same compound, is the Angelican Cathedral, which is constructed on the location of the former slave market. The altar of the cathedral is the specific site where the whipping post is located, where slaves were punished.

Slave Monument

Slave Market Catheral

I don’t know about you, but my head is already in Zanzibar, daydreaming about snorkeling, safaris, eating Swahili cuisine and smelling those fine spices, buying handmade merchandise and learning about local history. 

If you wanna learn more about these tours and Love & Dove Africa’s other tours or just get inspired by their photos, check out their website , follow them on instagram and  twitter !

 

Northwestern France (francophiles, you’ll love it!)

In my diary I’ve already written about the little road-trip I made with my boyfriend, and how we spent Bastille Day, and where we ate, what we did – everything worth mentioning about this beautiful journey through the northwest of France. Oh, how I love to go on these adventurous road-trips in France. There are hidden gems in every region. Picturesque villages, historical buildings and medieval castles, beautiful old architecture and local products worth your attention, worth tasting and definitely worth taking home as souvenirs.

Bretagne is a region I had already visited before, but only for a weekend – and only to visit a friend and her family (in Brest). There were so many places I had never discovered in this region, and I was finally on my way to visit at least a few of those places. And still – I have so much more to see!

Our first destination was Saint-Malo, a gorgeous coastal city. We went there to see the fireworks on Bastille Day. Which, by the way, was great!

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This is a city historically known for its privateers, which were basically pirates – but “good ones” as they were approved by the king.

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Saint-Malo was way more crowded than it looks. We literally spent 45 minutes trying to find somewhere to park, as all the spots in the city center were taken by people who came to the city to watch the fireworks in the evening.

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Saint-Malo Hotel de Ville is way nicer than a lot of other City Hall buildings, right?

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Saint-Malo is quite famous for these tall granite walls that surround the Old Town.

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Mont Saint-Michel

This island is located in the bay where Bretagne and Normandie merge, and many people are confused with what region it belongs to. Well, as much as I think the Bretons would have loved to claim it their own, it’s actually in Normandie. And what a beautiful treasure it is, this island and its monastery!

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The main source of income for the residents on Le Mont Saint-Michel is tourism, and with over 3 million visitors pr year they’re definitely keeping themselves busy!

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The monastery seen from the viewpoint – and a sneaky seagull!

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The Cloister

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Dinan

….And we were back in Bretagne! Visiting Dinan was a spontaneous decision. And quite a pleasant surprise. It’s an old idyllic town that will make any francophile start daydreaming.

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Many walls like these are decorated with gorgeous flowers

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One of the many restaurants in Dinan

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The river Rance

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The river Rance from a different perspective. Taken during our boat trip on the river.

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Basilique Saint Sauveur

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Rennes

Our final destination was the young and vibrant city Rennes, also in Bretagne. This city has a reputation for being a party central for students, and it’s easy to understand why. There’s a bar on pretty much every single corner. If you’re not really into the bar-scene, there’s a gorgeous park worth checking out for those lazy days in the sun, for the ones who love flowers, and for the photographers in need of a beautiful backdrop or fantastic close-ups of colorful flowers.

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Here it is…The beautiful Parc du Thabor.

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